Choose Your Candidate!

On your own paper, create an outline for an essay endorsing one candidate for the presidential election based on this article.  The outline should look like this:

I. Introduction (literally the word Introduction) – Name of the candidate you endorse.

II.  (Reason one you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

III.  (Reason two you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

IV. (Reason three you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

V. Conclusion (literally the word Conclusion)

Integrating Sources MLA Style

Hey everybody!

We are nearly ready to begin our mini research paper! Before we do so, we need to spend some time talking about how to integrate sources into your essays.

Why do we need citations? It’s simple:

  1.  To provide more information about a subject your reader might be interested in.
  2.  To provide evidence for the point that you are making.
  3.  To provide credit where credit is due.
  4.  To avoid plagiarism and a subsequent zero on the assignment, being kicked out of your university, or possible lawsuit!

How do you work this into your paper?   The University of Illinois has this to say about it.  You might want to check out what Harvard has to say on this matter if you need more information. To summarize, basically you need to follow the RACE method pictured below. In a typical paragraph, this means:

  1. Topic sentence (what is this ENTIRE paragraph about?)
  2. A detail sentence
  3. A quote or paraphrase from a source (evidence)
  4. An explanation of provided evidence
  5. A concluding sentence referring back to sentence #1

Let’s take a closer look at Step #3 (a quote or paraphrase from a  source).  At the end of this quote or paraphrase, you need a citation. The citation is in parentheses  and is ALWAYS either the author’s last name or (if you have no author) the article name in quotation marks. Examples:

Blah, blah, blah (Smith).

OR

Blah, blah, blah (“The Article Title”).

Notice on both of these, the period goes AFTER the parentheses, not before.

NOTE:  There should be a Works Cited entry for every citation, and for every Works Cited entry, there should be at least one citation in the paper. 

Make sure your paraphrased or quoted information flows smoothly with the rest of your paragraph. 

As you work on integrating your source material, keep in mind the following:

• Do not use two quotations in a row without intervening (explanatory) material of your own.

• Introduce a quote either by indicating what it is intended to show or by naming its source, or both.

• Avoid referring to your sources as quotes. Don’t write, “In this quote,” but instead something like “As Smith points out.” Never use the author’s first name, and never refer to the assignment or any part of the assignment, your teacher’s name,  “You”, “I”, or “We” or any forms of these.
(http://library.rpcc.edu)

Use the R.A.C.E. method:

Image result for r.a.c.e. writing

“RACE Writing Response (Freebie on a Snow Day!)”.  Middle of Lit.  02. Feb. 2015. Web. 03 Nov. 2016.

For practice, do the following:

1. On your own paper, write a paragraph summary or paraphrase of the first paragraph of this article,answering the question “Why do we need to integrate sources into our papers?”. Use one quote in the middle of your paragraph.

2.  On your own paper, write a paragraph summary or paraphrase of the first four paragraphs of this article.  Use one quote in the middle of your paragraph.

3. (Monday) On your own paper, create an outline for an essay endorsing one candidate for the presidential election based on this article.  The outline should look like this:

I. Introduction (literally the word Introduction)

II.  (Reason one you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

III.  (Reason two you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

IV. (Reason three you are for your candidate.)

Quote from the article that shows this, word for word, using quotation marks.

(Skip two lines)

V. Conclusion (literally the word Conclusion)

 

Personal Post Number One

hobbiesVella, Chris Lee. “Six Inexpensive Hobbies That Can Make Money.”  GettoSaving. Get To Saving, 2014. Web. 02 Nov. 2016.

It’s finally here! The day you’ve been waiting for! Today you get to write about what you WANT to write about! Choose a topic of your choice and create a post following the new standards. Remember:  it’s two paragraphs, two citations, two links, two images, two tags, and one category.  Keep it school appropriate and in correct grammar.  The sky’s the limit!  You could write about a hobby, a current issue, your favorite movie, or your favorite song. What inspires you? What excites you?  If you are having trouble with a topic, check out HubSpot’s topic generator or this topic generator.When you are finished, comment on a WPHS student’s personal post in five sentences.   Be sure to refer to the subject/comments made in the student’s original post.  If you have extra time, comment in one/two sentences on other posts (these “free” comments will not be grades but must use good grammar).

Due 11:59 Thursday, November 3, 2016. 

5 Easy Ways to Brainstorm Blog Topic Ideas

Cruz, Ambera. “Five Easy Ways to Brainstorm Blog Topic Ideas.” Meltwater, Meltwater. 29 Aug. 2013. Web. 02 Nov. 2016.

Are Driverless Cars a Good Idea?

After reading the article “PRO/CON: “Is the Idea of Driverless Cars Gaining Popularity?”, create a post entitled “Are Driverless Cars A Good Idea?”

In this post, you should:

  1.  Take a definite side and give at least two reasons why you support this side of the argument.
  2.  Have at least one sentence in which you discuss the opposing view, showing how it is wrong or not a good argument.
  3.  Include a picture of a driverless car.
  4.  Include a link to the original article.
  5.  Cite information or evidence from the article you read in your post correctly (do not simply just link it).  One way you might do this in your post would be as follows:  According to the article “Is the Idea of Driverless Cars Gaining Popularity?”, …
  6.  Cite information from one OTHER website on this topic, too. You will have to do a little research for this. Find another fact from a different article that supports your view of driverless cars.  Make sure you mention either the author’s name or the article name in your post.
  7.  At the bottom of your post, skip a line and write WORKS CITED (centered on the page), and beneath this place your sources in correct, alphabetized  MLA format.  REMEMBER:  We are using our grammar book as the reference on how to do this. Your entries should be in alphabetical order.  The basic format the book provides for an internet article is:

Author’s last name, First name.  “Title.”  Site Title.  Site sponsor, date of posting or last update.  Medium of publication. Date accessed.

 

*** Dates are typed in this format:  07 Sep. 2015.

 

8.  When you are finished, use the provided checklist to see if you your blog is up-to-date and ready for presentation on Friday.  Make changes or submissions as necessary.  If you submit something that is past due, please complete a “Late Assignment Form” sheet located in the back of the classroom and turn it in to the Late Work bin.

Assignment is due 11:59 pm Thursday, October 27th.

Should Parents Support School Meal Standards?

After reading the article Should Parents Support School Meal Standards , create a post entitled “Should Parents Support School Meal Standards.”   In this post, you should:

  1.  Take a definite side and give at least two reasons why you support this side of the argument.
  2.  Have at least one sentence in which you discuss the opposing view, showing how it is wrong or not a good argument.
  3.  Add a picture from one of the approved sites of a cafeteria food tray.  In parentheses beneath the picture, type the source for your information. Since it is a copyright-free photo, you do not need to write a full-blown citation:  just the website will suffice.
  4. Provide a link to the original article, embedded neatly into a sentence.
  5.  Cite information or evidence from the article you read in your post correctly (do not simply just link it).  One way you might do this in your post would be as follows:  According to the article “PRO/CON:  Should Parents Support School Meal Standards,” …
  6.  At the bottom of your post, skip a line and write Work Cited: (followed by a correct MLA citation of the article). REMEMBER:  We are using our grammar book as the reference on how to do this.  The basic format it provides for an internet article is:

Author’s last name, First name.  “Title.”  Site Title.  Site sponsor, date of posting or last update.  Medium of publication. Date accessed.

*Remember, you should indent second and subsequent lines if your entry goes into more than one line.  My formatting is not allowing me to do this correctly, so if your post does not allow you to do this, no worries!

7.  When you are finished, use the provided checklist to see if you your blog is up-to-date and ready for presentation on Friday.  Make changes or submissions as necessary.  If you submit something that is past due, please complete a “Late Assignment Form” sheet located in the back of the classroom and turn it in to the Late Work bin.

Assignment is due 11:59 pm Tuesday, October 25th.